Toms Shoes Attorney general charges five

Attorney general charges five in HP case

Former Hewlett Packard Co. board chair Patricia Dunn was arraigned in Santa Clara County Superior Court in San Jose yesterday after being charged with four felonies Wednesday by California Attorney General Bill Lockyer.

HP obtained the private telephone numbers of board members and at least nine news reporters in an attempt to determine who was leaking boardroom information to the media.

The conspiracy charge carries a sentence of up to one year in prison and a maximum of $25,000 in fines. Convictions on each of the other three charges could result in up to three years in prison, plus fines of up to $10,000 each.

Dunn, who is also being treated for advanced ovarian cancer, is surrendering voluntarily, as will Hunsaker, who is being represented by Palo Alto criminal lawyer Tom Nolan.

Two of the investigators, Ron DeLia of Boston and Bryan Wagner of Littleton, Colo., have agreed to voluntarily surrender and will travel to California to do so, probably within the next week, according to the attorney genera Toms Shoes l’s office. They will likely face bail of $50,000 each. There is no word on whether bail will be sought for Dunn or Hunsaker.

The fifth person charged, Matthew Depante of Melbourne, Fla., has not yet been contacted by the attorney general’s office.

In his press conference Wednesday in Sacramento, Lockyer said the investigation “remains active and is still incomplete,” indicating that other people could be charged. But that probably won’t include Toms Shoes HP CEO and board chairman Mark Hurd, as Lockyer said t Toms Shoes here is currently no evidence that Hurd broke any laws.

The criminal complaint filed Wednesday in Santa Clara Superior Court alleged that Dunn gave DeLia the home, cellular and office phone numbers of HP board members. It alleged that Hunsaker knew that investigators “obtained phone records by ruse” and that he gave outside investigators the home, cellular and office phone numbers of HP officials.

The complaint alleges that Dunn and Hunsaker hired DeLia to find the source of boardroom leaks to the media; DeLia hired ARG; and Wagner, employed by ARG, “performed the actual work of unlawfully obtaining phone records through false pretenses.”

“One of our state’s most venerable corporate institutions lost its way as its board sought to find out who leaked confid Toms Shoes ential company information to the press,” Lockyer said. “In this misguided effort, people inside and outside HP violated privacy rights and broke state law. On behalf of Californians, who cherish privacy so much they enshrined the right in our state constitution, those who crossed the legal line must be held accountable.”

Toms Shoes Attorney for Superior mother a

Attorney for Superior mother accused of smothering baby points to SIDS

An attorney for the Superior mother accused of suffocating her baby by putting plastic bags and blankets over his face pressed the deputy coroner Wednesday about whether the 6 month old boy could have suffered Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

“You see a number of the same symptoms in asphyxia as you would in a SIDS death?” Katherine Herald, one of Stephanie Rochester’s defense attorneys, asked Boulder County Deputy Coroner John Meyer during a preliminary hearing in Boulder’s district court.

Meyer agreed, adding that as is the case in many SIDS deaths, he was unable to nail down a time of death for Rylan Rochester, who was pronounced dead June 1 after his parents took him to Avista Adventist hospital in Louisville Toms Shoes .

But an autopsy didn’t uncover any fibers in Rylan’s nose, mouth or lungs, Meyer testified during Wednesday’s preliminary hearing, held to determine whether enough evidence exists for a case to proceed.

The judge ruled that it did, and Rochester is still being held without bond in Boulder County Jail.

“Yo Toms Shoes u could have ruled Rylan’s death SIDS,” Harold told Meyer. “The only reason you classified the death as asphyxia is because of Mrs. Rochester’s statements.”

Prosecutors played video of those statements in court Wednesday, and Rochester wept in the courtroom and covered her eyes.

In the video, she said she and her husband, Lloyd Rochester who filed for divorce shortly after her arrest couldn’t afford their Superior house and she didn’t think she could handle having a disabled child.

She said she had been concerned the baby had autism, even though doctors said he developing normally, and had taken Rylan to Children’s Hospital the night she’s accused of smothering him. She and her husband left without being seen, she said.

“When we got home, we started cooking dinner, and Lloyd just seemed so happy when it was just me and him,” she said. “I just felt he was really stressed at the doctor’s office and he seemed angry and said, ‘I didn’t think it was going to be like this.’ “That really hurt,” Rochester said in the recorded interview. “I don’t want to blame him, but I felt like it was my fault. So I thought I had to so something.”

Rochester said she “just wasn’t feeling safe” and thought, “I don’t know if I can handle this. I’ve suffered enough in my life, and I cannot suffer any more.”

She talked about how she placed a plastic Target bag over Rylan’s head on the night of May 31 for a minute or so.

“But I couldn’t do that in my heart, so I pulled it away and threw it away,” she said. “I just couldn’t do it.”

Later, after the couple ate dinner and talked about wanting to “have fun,” Rochester said she went back upstairs and put blankets over the baby’s face. She said they went to pack for an upcoming trip to Cape Cod and she took the blankets off at one point before putting them back on later.

“I didn’t have a plan,” she said in the taped interview. “I was just reacting. I don’t know.”

In the morning, when Rochester awoke to find her baby not breathing, she said, “I just lost it.”

“He wasn’t there any more,” she said before breaking down and putting her head in her hands.

The couple rushed to Avista Adventist, where staff members said they were acting appropriately for the situatio Toms Shoes n.

According to te Toms Shoes stimony Wednesday from Boulder County sheriff’s detective Don Dillard, an emergency room chaplain said the case appeared to be a “SIDS death.”

“She was following protocol after a SIDS death,” Dillard testified. “That includes giving them both time alone with their baby.”

Toms Shoes attorney files motion to suppr

attorney files motion to suppress evidence in marijuana case

Bowe was pulled over during a traffic stop on Nov. 10 in Riverside. The motion contends the search of his vehicle and person was conducted without a valid warrant, without probable cause and in an Toms Shoes unreasonable manner. It also contends Bowe statements were obtained without police reading him Miranda rights.

If a judge accepts the motion, the evidence in the case will be thrown out, though the speeding charge could still stand.

Bowe, who has an April 16 court date, said during a radio interview in January that he believed he was profiled during the traffic stop. Regan, clarifying what happened that night.

don believe I was racially profiled, Bowe said in the statement. believe I was pulled over for speeding. I have seen the police reports and videos given to my attorney in this case, and I want people to know I was treated with courtesy and respect by the police. I regret speeding in Riverside and have driven through Riverside many times since Nov. 10 without a problem. to the police, Bowe was pulled over for traveling 48 mph in a 35 mph zone. While speaking to Bowe, an officer detected what he suspected was a strong marijuana odor coming from inside his car, police said.

The motion contests there was an indication of consumed marijuana in the vehicle roaches no paraphernalia, lighters, matches or other forms of combustion. The motion also says the marijuana that was eventually found in the vehicle sealed in air tight capsules in a closed bag, it would be physically impossible for a human nose to detect any odor of smoked marijuana emanating from the vehicle. to police, after Bowe and two passengers got out of the car before a police dog checked for illegal substances, Bowe said had smoked a little marijuana while waiting at the airport.

The motion also disputes this, saying the occupants of the vehicle repeatedly denied consuming marijuana. The police report states the officer audio system went down prior to the arrest, and the motion says most of the encounter between Bowe and the officer is inaudible.

Bowe vigorously disputes certain statements attributed to him that are not on Toms Shoes tape, the motion states. should further be noted that his audio worked fine until the search of the vehicle. officer eventually arrested Bowe after finding a black bag containing his wallet, driver license and two containers of what the officer suspected to be marijuana.

One of Bowe passengers, George A. Thompson, said the bag belonged to him, police said, and during a search of Thompson, police also found two hand rolled cigarettes, containing 2.2 grams of suspected marijuana.

The motion states that Thompson indicated under oath that all the marijuana found in the car is his and that Bowe had no knowledge of its presence.

The motion also contends Bowe never gave consent to a search of his vehicle, alleging that one of the officers tried to coerce him into consenting to a search by telling him that the police dog on the scene an aggressive The motion says Bowe still refused to give consent, however, and argues that what followed was a warrantless search that led to his arrest.

only did the officer use coercive tactics in an attempt to pressure Mr. Bowe into consenting to a search of his vehicle by threatening to scratch up the interior of his car, the officer went ahead and searched the vehicle without any consent of Mr. Bowe, and without probable cause, the motion states.

Finally, the motion contends all statements Bowe made before he was eventually read his Miranda rights and taken to jail should be suppressed.

Bowe, 29, signed a five year, $56 million extension before last season and has a cap number of $12 million this year. He caught 57 passes for 673 yards and five touchdowns in 2013, one of the worst statistical seasons of his career, but has also vowed to report to camp in better shape.

The Chiefs offseason workouts begin on April 21, a Toms Shoes nd are limited to strength and conditioning and physical rehabilitation work only. Organized team activities, or OTAs, begin on May 27 and last through late June.

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